Vintage Photograph of the Brooklyn Bridge and a Garbage Barge from The New York Times in 1949

Feb. 18, 1949: Garbage was dumped onto a scow at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge, on its way to Staten Island, where the city had high hopes to reclaim nearly 2,000 acres of marsh for a parkway or even an airport. “We go everywhere against opposition and deep-rooted prejudice,” said Henry F. Cunningham, a World War II naval commander who oversaw the fleet charged with taking trash to Fresh Kills landfills. “We take a swampy area full of mosquitos and odors no better than those from refuse and transform it into fertile soil that can be made into beautiful parks,” Mr. Cunningham said.
Feb. 18, 1949: Garbage was dumped onto a scow at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge, on its way to Staten Island, where the city had high hopes to reclaim nearly 2,000 acres of marsh for a parkway or even an airport. “We go everywhere against opposition and deep-rooted prejudice,” said Henry F. Cunningham, a World War II naval commander who oversaw the fleet charged with taking trash to Fresh Kills landfills. “We take a swampy area full of mosquitos and odors no better than those from refuse and transform it into fertile soil that can be made into beautiful parks,” Mr. Cunningham said.
(photo back)

The Lively Morgue is a daily photo blog from the New York Times in which an original photo from the newspaper's archives is reposted along with tidbits of information gleamed from the historical article it accompanied.

Along with a rescan of the original photograph, the backs of each photo are also scanned, giving a behind-the-scenes look at the editorial process of one of the world's best newspapers.

Today's post features a garbage barge being loaded from the base of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1949.

Feb. 18, 1949: Garbage was dumped onto a scow at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge, on its way to Staten Island, where the city had high hopes to reclaim nearly 2,000 acres of marsh for a parkway or even an airport. “We go everywhere against opposition and deep-rooted prejudice,” said Henry F. Cunningham, a World War II naval commander who oversaw the fleet charged with taking trash to Fresh Kills landfills. “We take a swampy area full of mosquitos and odors no better than those from refuse and transform it into fertile soil that can be made into beautiful parks,” Mr. Cunningham said.

Brooklyn bridge 2x
Brooklyn Bridge

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