Vintage Photograph of a Sanitation Worker's Nightmare in Harlem, 1948

A nightmare for the city’s sanitation workers and mysophobes as The Times reported that a “survey of the areas flanking the New York Central Railroad elevated structure along Park Avenue, where Harlem merges with the Upper East Side, revealed side street conditions even more foul than those that can be seen daily by thousands of railroad travelers.” The commissioner of housing and buildings, fretting about a citywide problem of accumulating refuse, said it was “almost unbelievable what piles up overnight.””
A nightmare for the city’s sanitation workers and mysophobes as The Times reported that a “survey of the areas flanking the New York Central Railroad elevated structure along Park Avenue, where Harlem merges with the Upper East Side, revealed side street conditions even more foul than those that can be seen daily by thousands of railroad travelers.” The commissioner of housing and buildings, fretting about a citywide problem of accumulating refuse, said it was “almost unbelievable what piles up overnight.””
(photo back)
(photo back)

The Lively Morgue is a daily photo blog from the New York Times in which an original photo from the newspaper's archives is reposted along with tidbits of information gleamed from the historical article it accompanied. Along with a rescan of the original photograph, the backs of each photo are also scanned, giving a behind-the-scenes look at the editorial process of one of the world's best newspapers.

Today's post features a photo from September 1st, 1948, of Harlem and it's growing mountains of trash piled in the areas surrounding the Elevated Rail.

A nightmare for the city’s sanitation workers and mysophobes as The Times reported that a “survey of the areas flanking the New York Central Railroad elevated structure along Park Avenue, where Harlem merges with the Upper East Side, revealed side street conditions even more foul than those that can be seen daily by thousands of railroad travelers.” The commissioner of housing and buildings, fretting about a citywide problem of accumulating refuse, said it was “almost unbelievable what piles up overnight.””

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