Vintage Photograph of Children Watching the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade Atop a Phone Booth in 1969

Nov. 27, 1969: Youngsters found a good spot to view the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, from atop a telephone booth. “It was a day of abundance, not only of foods and goods, but of emotions also,” reported The Times. “Five raggedy children entered the Salvation Army cafeteria at 535 West 48th Street and, sitting among the weary old men and women who traditionally feast with the army on this holiday, received heaps of turkey and potatoes, peas and pumpkin pie.” Elsewhere, some G.I.s boycotted turkey dinner, to protest the American war in Vietnam, as did the Vegetarian Society of New York, to protest the exploitation of animals.
Nov. 27, 1969: Youngsters found a good spot to view the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, from atop a telephone booth. “It was a day of abundance, not only of foods and goods, but of emotions also,” reported The Times. “Five raggedy children entered the Salvation Army cafeteria at 535 West 48th Street and, sitting among the weary old men and women who traditionally feast with the army on this holiday, received heaps of turkey and potatoes, peas and pumpkin pie.” Elsewhere, some G.I.s boycotted turkey dinner, to protest the American war in Vietnam, as did the Vegetarian Society of New York, to protest the exploitation of animals.
(photo back)
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The Lively Morgue is a daily photo blog from the New York Times in which an original photo from the newspaper's archives is reposted along with tidbits of information gleamed from the historical article it accompanied. Along with a rescan of the original photograph, the backs of each photo are also scanned, giving a behind-the-scenes look at the editorial process of one of the world's best newspapers.

Today's posting features a great shot from November 27th, 1969, in which several children sit atop a phone booth to catch a glimpse at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

Nov. 27, 1969: Youngsters found a good spot to view the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, from atop a telephone booth. “It was a day of abundance, not only of foods and goods, but of emotions also,” reported The Times. “Five raggedy children entered the Salvation Army cafeteria at 535 West 48th Street and, sitting among the weary old men and women who traditionally feast with the army on this holiday, received heaps of turkey and potatoes, peas and pumpkin pie.” Elsewhere, some G.I.s boycotted turkey dinner, to protest the American war in Vietnam, as did the Vegetarian Society of New York, to protest the exploitation of animals.

Check out the original article from 1969 for more.

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