Captain Obvious: City Audit Finds Subways are Filthy Garbage Dumps

Modern Culture | There are many times that I think to myself:
 "What the hell are people thinking?" 
Well, yesterday night there was one of these moments when I saw this bin. Apparently, the bin got full, but people didn't notice. People kept on throwing their litter away, although they knew that the waste was going to end up on the floor. But the question is...Who cares?? Do YOU care? People could have just held on to their bottles/wrappings etc, till they found a proper bin. But obviously they didn't care...

<u>Info</u>
Nikon D90 
Tokina 11-16 @ 11mm
f/3.2
1/25 sec handheld
ISO 400
Post processing using LR3
Modern Culture | There are many times that I think to myself: "What the hell are people thinking?" Well, yesterday night there was one of these moments when I saw this bin. Apparently, the bin got full, but people didn't notice. People kept on throwing their litter away, although they knew that the waste was going to end up on the floor. But the question is...Who cares?? Do YOU care? People could have just held on to their bottles/wrappings etc, till they found a proper bin. But obviously they didn't care... Info Nikon D90 Tokina 11-16 @ 11mm f/3.2 1/25 sec handheld ISO 400 Post processing using LR3
Photo: wired_gr

AM New York reports:

The subway system is nothing if not a dirty, smelly place. But it doesn't have to be so bad if the MTA stuck to its cleaning schedules, according to an audit from city Comptroller Scott Stringer.

The audit shows that tracks in seven stations -- just 3% of the 276 underground stops -- met New York City Transit's cleaning schedule, once every three weeks. More than half the stations got between four and eight visits from an 11-person cleaning crew a year, according to the audit of cleaning records between July 2013 and June 2014.

"The tracks have become appalling garbage dumps," Stringer said at a news conference outside of the F train stop at East Broadway. "The MTA has failed to clean them according to their own standards."

The MTA uses two vacuum trains to suck up litter on the tracks, with a $23 million contract out for three more. But the vacuum trains in use now can't get all the trash, because they run on a low setting to prevent damage to the tracks, according to the audit.

In looking at 33 station tracks before and after a vacuum train cleaning, there were pieces of garbage that stayed on the track bed. Meanwhile, equipment failures sidelined the vacuum trains for 188 days over the year studied, the audit found.

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